medical marijuana

Health Canada to spot check medical marijuana after tainted pot recall
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Health Canada says it will begin random testing of medical marijuana products to check for the presence of banned pesticides after contaminated products led to reports of illnesses and the possibility of a class action lawsuit. [...]
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Employee insurance plan must pay for medical marijuana, human rights board rules
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A human rights board has determined a Nova Scotia man's prescribed medical marijuana must be covered by his employee insurance plan, a ruling that advocates say will likely have impact nationwide. [...]
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Stigma of the lazy pot-smoker hurts medical marijuana users: Opinion
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The image of the lazy pot-smoker remains one of the most prevailing stigmas about medical cannabis users. [...]
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Ottawa bringing in stricter limits on medical marijuana for veterans
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Veterans Affairs is dramatically scaling back the quantity of medical marijuana it will cover for veterans, to three grams a day from 10 grams. [...]
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Vomiting 'all day long': A little-known possible side-effect of marijuana
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A Halifax woman says she was diagnosed with cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome after vomiting every day for eight months straight, a symptom that only ended when she gave up medical marijuana. [...]
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Shoppers Drug Mart formally applies to distribute medical marijuana
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Canada's largest pharmacy chain has formally applied to be a distributor of medical marijuana. [...]
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NO MEDICAL VALUE? US GOVT HAS BEEN FUNDING THIS ISRAELI CANNABIS RESEARCHER FOR 50 YEARS
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NO MEDICAL VALUE? US GOVT HAS BEEN FUNDING THIS ISRAELI CANNABIS RESEARCHER FOR 50 YEARS cannabis-sativa-plant [9/25/16] JUSTIN GARDNER– As many Americans approach November 4 with a sense of dread, facing the fact that either Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton will be the next president, much more hopeful things will be going on that day. Residents in at least nine states will be voting on ballot initiatives to legalize recreational or medical cannabis use. Considering the tide of public opinion in favor of legalization, we can expect that most, if not all, of these states will vote for freedom and access to a wondrous medicinal plant. Even the power of Big Pharma, which is pouring money into campaigns to derail legalization efforts since medical cannabis threatens their profits, might be no match for the mass awakening. For the most part it’s up to the states to lead the way, since federal government appears to be firmly stuck in prohibition. The DEA, which preys on the populace through the drug war, just reaffirmed its commitment to lunacy by keeping cannabis as a Schedule 1 drug with “no currently accepted medical use.” This policy, having no basis in reality, guides the federal government’s attitude. We could go on about the mountains of scientific evidence that have come out on the medical benefits of cannabis and its extracts, or the fact that the American Epilepsy Society considers CBD oil to have the greatest potential for treating epileptic seizures, or the fact that many veterans with PTSD find cannabis to be the only effective treatment, and so on. While the feds were throwing people in cages for weed possession in its escalation of the war on drugs — based on false pretenses, racism and suppression of the antiwar movement — another part of the government was funding medical cannabis research the entire time. For 50 years, the U.S. National institutes of Health (NIH) has been funding an Israeli cannabis researcher. Raphael Mechoulam, now 84, was the first person to isolate the structure of both tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), and was the first to test the medicinal properties of THC. 30 years later, Mechoulam and his team discovered that THC triggered what they called the endocannabinoid system. This revolutionary figure in cannabis research was receiving $100,000 a year from the NIH, while drug agencies and police across the U.S. wrecked countless lives and seized billions from innocent people. “It started in 1963, when Mechoulam applied for NIH funding and was told that cannabis research wasn’t of interest to the agency because marijuana wasn’t an “American problem,” recalls Mechoulam. “They told me to let them know when I have something more relevant to the U.S.” A year later, Mechoulam received another call from the same official. A U.S. senator, whose name the official withheld from Mechoulam, had caught his son smoking weed. The senator had asked the NIH what e [...]
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Massachusetts police used a military style helicopter to seize a single marijuana plant from an 81 year old woman using it to ease her arthritis and glaucoma.
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Massachusetts police used a military style helicopter to seize a single marijuana plant from an 81 year old woman using it to ease her arthritis and glaucoma. All that remains of the solitary marijuana plant an 81-year-old grandmother had been growing behind her South Amherst home is a stump and a ragged hole in the ground. Margaret Holcomb said she was growing the plant as medicine, a way to ease arthritis and glaucoma and help her sleep at night. Tucked away in a raspberry patch and separated by a fence from any neighbors, the plant was nearly ready for harvest when a military-style helicopter and police descended on Sept. 21. In a joint raid, the Massachusetts National Guard and State Police entered her yard and cut down the solitary plant in what her son, Tim Holcomb, said was a “pretty shocking” action — one that he argues constitutes unlawful surveillance and illegal search and seizure. “It’s scary as hell,” said Tim Holcomb. Holcomb said he was at his mother’s home eating a late lunch with his sister when they heard whirring blades and looked up to see a military-style helicopter circling the property, with two men crouching in an open door and holding a device that he suspects was a thermal imager to detect marijuana plants. Margaret Holcomb was not home at the time. Within 10 minutes of the helicopter departing, several vehicles arrived at the home, including a pickup truck with a bed filled with marijuana plants seized at other locations, and several State Police troopers, including one who flashed his badge. “He asked me if I knew there was a marijuana plant growing on the property. I didn’t answer the question. I asked, ‘What are you doing here?’” Holcomb recalled. Holcomb said he was told that as long as he did not demand that a warrant be provided to enter the property or otherwise escalate the situation, authorities would file no criminal charges. “’We just want the illegal contraband,’” Holcomb recalled the officer saying. Margaret Holcomb does not have a medical card authorizing her to grow or possess marijuana. Margaret Holcomb said she is “not a huge social activist” but she is ready to stand up in this case, in which she feels like her civil rights were violated. If she’s unable to get medical marijuana by other means, she said, she may grow another plant. “I’m prepared to take actions if I need to,” Margaret Holcomb said. “I don’t picture them out here and putting an 81-year-old woman in jail.” State police spokesman David Procopio confirmed in an email that State Police and National Guard enforcement occurred in the Amherst and Northampton area Sept. 21. He said the plant at Margaret Holcomb’s home was one of 44 found on various properties outside and in plain view that day. “At each location where property owners were home, troopers identified themselves and explained the purpose for the visit, why the plants were being grown ill [...]
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Medical marijuana patients growing more pot than they need and selling off the rest
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Medical marijuana patients who are licensed to grow their own are producing more than they need and selling off the rest. [...]
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Sydney marijuana clinic serving more than 400 clients after 1 year
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A medical marijuana clinic that opened in Sydney last year to help military veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder or physical pain has expanded its clientele to include hundreds of civilians. [...]
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It Isn’t Only marijuana The FDA has always Rejected the existence of therapeutic benefits associated with ALL plants
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Those who support the nationwide legalization of marijuana for therapeutic use, were disappointed by the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) recent failure to reclassify marijuana’s status from that of a Schedule I drug to another more appropriate classification. Since 23 states have now legalized marijuana for medical use, and since numerous studies have confirmed its value as medicine and have proven that it is safe, it seemed the logical next step to begin relaxing the laws at the federal level. Is marijuana really more dangerous than meth or PCP? After all, Schedule I drugs under the Controlled Substances Act are defined as those having “high potential for abuse; no currently accepted medical use; [and] lack of accepted safety for use under medical supervision.” Aside from marijuana, schedule I drugs include heroin and other drugs that can be considered dangerous. But to anyone with any semblance of an open mind, marijuana should not fall into this category – especially considering that Schedule II substances (which are legally considered less dangerous than Schedule I drugs), include methamphetamine, cocaine and PCP. Could any sane person argue that marijuana is somehow more dangerous than meth, cocaine or PCP? The truth is that the FDA does not operate on principles that could be considered sane. In fact, the agency’s long history of outlawing natural plant-based therapeutic substances clearly indicates that its chief mission is to protect the multi-billion dollar pharmaceutical industry. For example, the FDA’s handling of one such plant-based medicinal substance – pyridoxamine – reveals the extent to which the agency is willing to stoop to protect the interests of drug manufacturers. In 2005, the pharmaceutical company Biostratum, Inc., found out that pyridoxamine – the active ingredient of one of its new drugs – was already available as a natural supplement and had been on the market for decades. Fearing the loss of profits, Biostratum approached the FDA asking the agency to declare supplements containing pyridoxamine as being “adulterated” – a move that would effectively prevent anyone other than Biostratum from selling the substance. The FDA, always eager to please Big Pharma, even went a step further. Instead of declaring products containing pyridoxamine as adulterated, they declared that such products were not dietary supplements at all. And if there was any doubt as to their motive in doing so, the FDA’s own statement reveals the real reason: “To allow such an article to be marketed as a dietary supplement would not be fair to the pharmaceutical company that brought, or intends to bring, the drug to market.” Never mind that pyridoxamine had already been available for many years in the form of an inexpensive natural dietary supplement; now that a drug company had figured out a way to market pyridoxamine, that meant that everyone else had to stop selling it, or else [...]
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