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PTSD

Head of VA supports medical marijuana for veterans with PTSD
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Julie Fidler President Donald Trump’s stance on legalizing medical cannabis is a big question mark, and Attorney General Jeff Sessions hates marijuana and has expressed his intent to stiffen drug penalties. But there is at least one person in the government who sees the potential of marijuana as a medicine, and that person is Veterans Affairs (VA) Secretary David Shulkin. Shulkin, a holdover from the Obama administration, told reporters on May 31, 2017, that he’s “interested” in exploring how cannabis can benefit veterans wrestling with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). [1] ptsd PTSD Journal “Right now, federal law does not allow us at VA to look at that [medical marijuana] as an option for veterans … I believe that everything that could help veterans should be debated by Congress and by medical experts and we will implement that law. So if there is compelling evidence that this is helpful, I hope that people take a look at that and come up with the right decision. And then we will implement that.” [2] Just a week before Shulkin’s statements, the American Legion (the country’s largest veterans organization) called on the Trump administration to “clear the way for clinical research in the cutting-edge areas of cannabinoid receptor research.” Currently, VA doctors are not allowed to recommend medical cannabis to veterans because it remains a Schedule I drug under federal law, meaning the government does not recognize its medicinal benefits. Heroin – which killed more than 13,000 people in 2015 – falls into the same category. However, Shulkin emphasized in 2016 that VA doctors can discuss the matter in states where medical marijuana is legal. [1] Sources: [1] attn: [2] Vice News [3] UPI PTSD Journal [...]
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Consequences of pot program cuts 'should be alarming,' says veteran with PTSD
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Veterans Affairs spent $63.7 million in 2016-17 for medical marijuana for nearly 4,500 veterans — a bill that is expected to drop dramatically when new rules come into effect Monday. [...]
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DEA finally approves marijuana to be studied for veterans suffering from PTSD
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(NaturalNews) In a long overdue move, the United States Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) has finally granted approval for clinical trials researching the therapeutic value of marijuana on veterans suffering from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).The DEA's decision will potentially... [...]
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Five kids ripped from family after veteran father pursued cannabis treatment for PTSD: ‘They’re using my kids as a pawn to take away freedoms I fought for’
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(NaturalNews) Okay, the fun is over with this pot "sort of" legalization thing. Now it's getting serious.With some states allowing recreational and medical use of pot, some states only allowing medical uses, some states not allowing either, and the Obama administration selectively... amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit0"; amzn_assoc_search_bar = "true"; amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "marajuana-20"; amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "manual"; amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart"; amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon"; amzn_assoc_region = "US"; amzn_assoc_title = "My Amazon Picks"; amzn_assoc_linkid = "9f2a69cee3a618de637d280900b48b28"; amzn_assoc_asins = "1936807238,B00P6YWUVW,B01BW5FA06,B007YJ1CNO"; [...]
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Can a Single Injection Save Soldiers Suffering from PTSD?
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Farwell spent 16 months in Afghanistan as a U.S. Army combat infantryman; above, patrolling in Naka district, Paktika province, Summer 2006. I would be pissed I didn’t get this shot earlier if I weren’t so grateful I got it at all. I haven’t been quite right since the war, posttraumatic stress and all. Nothing I did in seven years of trying to get back to normal—therapy, meds, madcap schemes—really helped. It turns out a big part of the cure was under my nose the whole time. Well, six or seven inches under my nose and a couple of inches back and to the right, in a cluster of nerves by the spinal column called the stellate ganglion. Two injections of a couple of local anesthetics—lidocaine, the same thing dentists use, and bupivacaine—into that part of the neck and I was pretty much back to my old self. Dr. Eugene Lipov, the man who administered my shot and who has pioneered the use of the so-called stellate ganglion block for PTSD, tells me the Navy SEALs call it the God shot. Well, SEALs have their sea stories. Here is mine. I came back from Afghanistan in the spring of 2007, developed insomnia that was eventually diagnosed as PTSD in 2008 and every few months for the next five years had either a major legal or psychological issue—the kind that led to hospitalization or jail time. As hard as I had to fight in Afghanistan, I had to fight doubly hard to get here, a place where I’m celebrating two years without getting locked in a loony bin or a cell. During my 16 months as a U.S. Army combat infantryman in Afghanistan, the enemy lived outside the wire and had no face. He hid in plain sight and used IEDs or indirect fire. Back in the States, the enemy also hid in plain sight. The thing is, he wore my face and occupied my brain. This isn’t a war story. This is a postwar story. Let’s break it down by the numbers. 03 America has been at war for more than 14 years since September 11, 2001. This is the longest war in American history and the least debated. Most of the U.S. isn’t really at war. It is spaced-out in front of glowing rectangles. At any given time, only about one half of one percent of Americans are in the military. That’s about the same number who identify as New Age or Hindu. This number includes all members of the military—from stateside desk jockeys to foul-smelling infantry privates—and most are serving in soft jobs, whether or not they’re deployed. The infantry makes up only 15 percent of the Army; by comparison, elderly people make up 14 percent of the general population. Of post-9/11 veterans, 20 percent suffer from PTSD. Only 50 percent say the war in Afghanistan was worth it. And in 2012, 45 percent of the 1.6 million veterans of Afghanistan and Iraq applied for disability benefits from the Department of Veterans Affairs. “The mental health of our troops is very much a national security issue,” says Dr. Elspeth Ritchie, a former military psychiatrist who held the top mental-health job in the Arm [...]
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RI Senate panel considering bill to treat PTSD with marijuana
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PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — The Senate Health and Human Services Committee is mulling legislation that would allow post-traumatic stress disorder to be treated with medical marijuana. Democratic Sen. Stephen Archambault, of Smithfield, introduced the ... [...]
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New Hampshire seeks to add PTSD to list of medical marijuana ills
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A bill introduced Thursday in the New Hampshire state assembly seeks to add post-traumatic stress disorder to the list of ailments eligible for medical marijuana treatment, which was legalized in 2013 but remains hard to obtain in the Granite state. [...]
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‘Cancer Screening Has Never Saved Lives’ – BMJ Study Concludes
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Millions have marched for “cancer causes.” Millions more have been diagnosed “early” and now believe screening saved their lives. But a new study confirms something we have been reporting on since our inception: In most cases, screening not only has not “saved lives,” but actually increases your risk of dying. An extremely important new study published in the British Medical Journal titled, “Why cancer screening has never been shown to “save lives”—and what we can do about it,” confirms something we have been reporting upon at GreenMedInfo.com since our inception, namely, cancer screening has not lived up to its long held promise of “saving lives” because disease-specific reductions in mortality do not equate to reductions in overall mortality. Worse, in some cases overall mortality actually increased because of screening. In the new study, Vinay Prasad and colleagues, argue that the real benchmark for the success of any cancer screening program is if the “early stage” cancers being diagnosed and treated actually result in a reduction in the overall mortality. For instance, we have reported extensively on the widespread misclassification of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) as a bono fide malignant cancer, as well as its epidemic level overdiagnosis and overtreatment. Tens of fhousands of women are diagnosed each year with these so-called “early stage breast cancers,” even though the National Cancer Institute itself acknowledges it should be classified as a benign or indolent lesions of epithelial origin.The New England Journal of Medicine published a study in 2012 shows that approximately 1.3 million women were diagnosed with DCIS in the past 30 years, with most receiving either mastectomy, lumpectomy, radiation, chemotherapy, or some combination thereof. Ironically, many of these women ardently believe that their lives were “saved” by the screening and treatment, succumbing to the biomedical equivalent of Stockholm syndrome where identifying with the ‘aggressor’ becomes palliative. In reality, most suffered irreparable harm not from the “cancer,” but from both the psychological and physical effects of being wrongly diagnosed and treated. If the end point were not breast cancer specific mortality (‘invasive’ breast cancer has not declined but increased with screening, indicating overdiagnosis), but overall mortality, it is likely that these DCIS diagnosed women’s lives were significantly truncated because of screening programs; at the very least, the quality of their lives would have been significantly negatively impacted. Much of the damage, pain, and suffering associated with over-medicalization could have been avoided if public health advocates and private industry promoters of screening programs had realized that reducing the risk of cancer in one bodily location — the breast, the colon, the lung, the thyroid — does not necessarily translate into a reduction in mortality risk everywhere [...]
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Veteran’s Children Taken & Held Hostage by Govt Agents for Legally Treating his PTSD with Cannabis
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Disabled Navy veteran Raymond Schwab moved to Colorado last year to free himself from addictions that grew out of the pharmaceuticals prescribed by the VA to treat his service-related physical and psychological injuries. As Veterans for Medical Cannabis Access points out, medical cannabis is an effective treatment for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), where other drugs fail. Veterans are successfully treating themselves despite the federal government’s prohibition. Because Schwab is legally using medicinal cannabis in Colorado, officials in prohibitionist Kansas have abducted five of his children, ranging from 5 to 16 years of age. The ransom demanded by the Kansas “child protection” bureaucracy is a promise that Schwab will refrain from using cannabis, and four months of “clean” urinalysis test results. “They’re basically using my kids as a pawn to take away freedoms I fought for,” Schwab explained to the Denver Post. “It’s a horrible position to put me in.” The family’s trauma originated in what could be called a “Pavlik Morozov-in-reverse” scenario. Morozov, a school-age youth living in Ukraine during the 1930s, was a member of the Soviet Young Pioneers who informed on his father to the secret police. Morozov’ father was arrested and murdered by the NKVD, and the youngster was honored by the Soviet regime as a “patriotic” exemplar whose loyalty to the state transcended filial piety. DARE programs notoriously promote a similar mentality within American schoolchildren, encouraging them to snoop through medicine cabinets in search of forbidden substances and call the police in the event any are found. In the case of the Schwab family, the generational relationship was inverted. The Post relates that during a visit to Kansas the children’s material grandmother “took the kids to a police station in another county and reported them abandoned,” something she reportedly has come to regret. Last April, a child abuse investigation cleared Schwab of harming his children in any way. Yet a judge has ruled that the children will remain in state control until Schwab and his wife foreswear any further legal use of cannabis. Schwab’s case is somewhat similar to that of medical liberty activist Shona Banda, a resident of Garden City, Kansas whose 11-year-old son was also abducted by government officials after the youngster spoke out in school about the benefits his mother had experienced using cannabis oil to treat her otherwise intractable Crohn’s disease. The well-informed young man, [...]
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Cannabidiol or CBD is a non-psychotropic medical miracle for many. That’s why the establishment is trying hard to wrest it from our hands. See the evidence and medical fraud reaction.
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One thing I find aggravating is the fact that CBD oil was available for sale on amazon a year or two ago, and now it's gone. Why? I thought it was legal? Oh. I just found this. Apparently it's only legal in 15 states. This is very strange because I thought CBD was not federally controlled (ie: not on the DEA schedule), so only cannabis-derived CBD was illegal as it would likely contain minute amounts of THC. This is how they are able to continue to sell hemp-oil which contains CBD, federally. Is CBD too far removed from delta9THC to fall under the analogue-act? If so, it's non-psychotropic, so then everything else that's non-psychotropic in cannabis would also be illegal along with endocannabinoids produced in your brain, which means all sorts of other substances in for example butter would be illegal too by transitive equality. I thought the line was drawn with psychotropic substancesas outlined by the UN 1971 Convention on Psychotropic Substances, to inform country policy on what was [...]
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Fructose in table sugar and high-fructose corn syrup In Coke Fuels Cancer
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Sugar found in ketchup and Coke linked to breast cancer Researchers find high-sugar Western diet may increase the risk of breast cancer Both authors said that identifying the risk factors for breast cancer was a public health priority Both authors said that identifying the risk factors for breast cancer was a public health priority Photo: Alamy By Agency2:12PM GMT 01 Jan 2016Comments65 Comments A common sugar found in drinks such as Coke and food like ketchup, cereal bars and biscuits could be driving breast cancer, scientists warn. The high-sugar Western diet may increase the risk of breast cancer and the potential for that cancer to spread to the lungs, the new study suggests. Researchers found that when mice were given a sucrose-rich diet, similar to our own diet in the West, the mice showed increased levels of tumour growth and metastasis, when the cancer spreads. • One drink a day increases the risk of breast cancer by 15 per cent They also found that fructose in table sugar and high-fructose corn syrup found in a range of foods and drinks could be driving the disease. Scientists at the University of Texas MD Anderson Centre gave groups of mice one of four different diets and found that at six months old, 30 per cent of those raised on starch-controlled diets had measurable tumours. Of those mice which had been raised on a sucrose-enriched diet, 50 to 58 per cent had developed breast cancer. "We found that sucrose intake in mice comparable to levels of Western diets led to increased tumour growth and metastasis, when compared to a non-sugar starch diet." Dr Peiying Yang The study, published in the online edition of the Cancer Research journal, also showed that cancers in mice on high sucrose or fructose diet were more likely to spread than those on starch-controlled diets. One of the authors of the study, Professor Lorenzo Cohen, said: "We determined that it was specifically fructose, in table sugar and high-fructose corn syrup, ubiquitous within our food system, which was responsible for facilitating lung metastasis and 12-HETE production in breast tumours." Co-author Dr Peiying Yang said that she believed this was the first study to investigate the direct effect of sugar consumption and effect on the development of breast cancer. She added: "We found that sucrose intake in mice comparable to levels of Western diets led to increased tumour growth and metastasis, when compared to a non-sugar starch diet." Both authors said that identifying the risk factors for breast cancer was a public health priority. • Scientists discover 'trigger' which could stop breast cancer spreading [...]
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